Frequently Asked Questions

How Old do I have to Be

The Minimum age to Join the site is 13 and to Publish Music is 16 as set out by the GDPR (General Data Protection regulations)

However if you are Publishing Music for Sale then you have to be 18 or over depending on your country of residence. If you are under the age 18 a Parent or Legal Guardian must help to setup your account and confirm that they have accepted our Terms of Service and relevant Publishing and Royalty Contracts.

What type of Music can I publish

You can Publish any type or style of music including cover tunes.

However you cannot sell Cover Tunes.

What are the restrictions on selling music

The only restrictions are:

You cannot sell cover tunes.

You can only sell original songs.

Any Music inappropriate for under 18's must be marked as "Over 18"

You cannot sell Videos.

Are there restrictions on Covers

Yes. Covers of previously published music cannot be sold.

You are required to choose the option in the uploads section that says "This is A Cover Song"

If you ignore this rule your account will be suspended for 7 days for a first attempt and your account will Deleted on a subsequent attempt.

Why do we ask for age verification

You may notice that we ask you a lot during the registration process to confirm that you are either over the age of 16 or the Parent/Legal Guardian of a member under the age of 16.

The reason we ask for multiple confirmations is that under the new GDPR (General Data Protection Regulations) the fine for breaching the regulations is in the Millions of Pounds.

A two-tiered sanctions regime will apply. Breaches of some provisions by businesses, which law makers have deemed to be most important for data protection, could lead to fines of up to €20 million or 4% of global annual turnover for the preceding financial year, whichever is the greater, being levied by data watchdogs. For other breaches, the authorities could impose fines on companies of up to €10m or 2% of global annual turnover, whichever is greater.

We thought you would Understand 🙂

Legal Age of Consent for Contracts

There are different regulations around the world and even within certain countries as to the Age of Legal Consent. In order to sell Music on our Platform and our affiliates we require that our contracts are accepted by someone who is over the age of legal consent in there place of residence.

You must be Over the Age of 18 in most countries except the following.

Age 19 -

Canada (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Yukon, Nunavut)
United States (Alabama, Nebraska)
Algeria
South Korea

Age 20 -

Japan
New Zealand
Thailand
Taiwan

Age 21 -

United States (Colorado, Mississippi),
Bahrain
Cameroon
Gabon
Grenada
Honduras
Ivory Coast
Lesotho
Madagascar
Namibia
Singapore
Swaziland
United Arab Emirates
Puerto Rico
Zambia

Information for Parents or Guardians re: Membership

We allow people over the age of 16 to open an account and publish both original and cover songs.

Under the terms of the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulations) any one under the age of 16 is not allowed to sign up to digital membership sites.

The General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) require parental consent for children under the age 16 who use digital services.

You will notice that our site asks on sign up and if your child is an artist each time they upload a new song or album to confirm that either they are over the age of 16 or that The Parent or Legal Guardian is aware and agrees to the song and or video to be uploaded.

Information for Parents or Guardians re: Paypal

We allow people over the age of 16 to open an account and publish both original and cover songs.

Only "Original Songs" may be sold on the site and we require a valid PayPal account to make payments to.

Under PayPal terms and Conditions the holder of a PayPal account must be over the age of 18.

Therefore we require confirmation in writing to accounts@openmicartists.com that you authorise Open Mic Artists to pay any income from the sale of original music by an artist under the age of 18 to the qualifying PayPal account.

The email must include the Artists name, User Name and the Name, Address and contact details of the Parent or Legal Guardian with the appropriate PayPal account information.

How to Use your Profile 1

How to Use your Profile 2

How to Use The Artists Dashboard.

 This section only applies to Artists with publishing access.

How much commission do you take.

The commission breakdown is in the Royalty Sharing Contract  however the simple answer is 25% of all net sales regardless of whether the sale is through Open Mic Artists Platform or one of our Affiliates. ( Google Play, I Tunes )

When will my Music Appear on Google Play?

Google Play

When will my Music Appear on I Tunes?

I tunes

Information on Copyrighting your songs and what we do for you.

As a part of your registration process as an Artist/s on Open Mic Artists includes the issue of your unique ISRC (INTERNATIONAL ROYALTIES COLLECTION SERVICE) Code.

We ensure that your music is protected and that you are the legal copyright owner.

Each Artist is issued with an ISRC code and that code (Issued by the PPL) is registered with the PPL in the Artist/s name.

This ensures that you the Artist/s get paid for every use of your Musical Composition, whether that be sales on our platform or any associated platform (Google Play, I-tunes)  and any public broadcast including but not limited to Radio play, broadcast in a place of business or any other public performance of any or part of your Musical Composition.

Open Mic Artists are dedicated to ensuring that all Musical Compositions and the the copyright holders are correctly remunerated for their work.

Information on the PPL (You should all read this)

http://www.ppluk.com/

The coffee shop, Stephen Carwardine & Co, had been keeping its customers entertained by playing records. EMI, then called The Gramophone Company, argued it was against the law to play the record in public without first receiving the permission of the copyright owners. The judge agreed, establishing this as an important legal principle.

EMI and Decca formed Phonographic Performance Ltd (PPL) to carry out this licensing role and opened the first office in London.

There has been much technological, social and legal advancement since PPL was formed in the 1930's. The Copyright Act 1956 led to PPL's role expanding to cover the licensing of broadcasters that played recorded music. The popularity and growth of radio in the 1960's and 70's led to burgeoning PPL revenues. Further copyright law changes in 1988 strengthened PPL's licensing position.

In 1996, performers were given the rights to receive 'equitable remuneration' where recordings of their performances were played in public or broadcast – leading to PPL paying them royalties directly for the first time. Performer organisations PAMRA and AURA merged with PPL in 2006, leading to an annual meeting and dedicated board specifically for performers.

From collecting £1 million in our first decade of business to now collecting over £150 million a year, we are managing more rights for more members with a larger amount of money being paid out – enabling more licensees to play a greater variety of music. We have also branched out to collect royalties internationally for when our members' recordings have been played in other countries.

The digital age has brought ongoing challenges to the music industry and recorded music. We continue to fight to protect our members' rights and work with governments and leading industry bodies to ensure the creative industries are supported.

PPL issues licences to hundreds of thousands of businesses and organisations from all sectors across the UK playing recorded music and/or music videos in public. These can range from bars, nightclubs, shops and hotels to offices, factories, gyms, schools, universities and local authorities. PPL also licenses music suppliers to copy recorded music for services such as in-store music systems, jukeboxes, compilations for exercise classes and in-flight entertainment systems.

PPL also licenses TV and radio broadcasters to play recorded music as part of their programming, from the BBC, ITV, Channel4, Five and Sky to commercial radio networks such as Capital, Heart and Absolute Radio, as well as online services. See what happens to the licence fee.

PPL does not retain a profit for its services. Every penny, after administration costs, is passed onto its registered members, thousands of performers and record companies who receive the royalties they deserve for their recorded music. How does PPL distribute the royalties?

PPL members range from session musicians and emerging artists to major record labels and globally successful performers – all of whom are entitled to be fairly paid for the use of their recorded music. Through agreements with over 50 music licensing companies around the world, PPL is also able to collect royalties for its members globally.

PPL is one of several collection societies in the UK that manage the rights and licence different types of copyrighted material. PPL licenses the use of recorded music while others exist to manage rights in musical compositions, newspaper extracts, etc. Each of these organisations enable the user of these materials to obtain a licence, so both users and copyright owners can benefit from increased efficiency.

PPL is the global leader in collecting performance royalties internationally. Also known as neighbouring rights royalties, we have collected more than £226 million over the past decade.

Information on our Contracts

Information on our Single Song Contract

Information on Copyright Issues

Why do we have Contracts on each Submission

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